Monday, June 16, 2014

What Is The Electoral College?

           The Electoral College. This is something a lot of Americans don't understand but should. A large group of us agree that it needs reform. Some even think it needs to be replaced. Either way we should be aware of it, and how it works.
         
The Electoral College consists of "electors". These electors are the ones that physically vote for the president and vice president. Electors are broken up by state. Each state gets one elector for each of its members in the House of Representatives, and one for each of their Senators (each state has two Senators). In total that's 538 electoral votes. 100 for Senators, 435 for House of Representatives and three extra for the District of Columbia.
            Every state is represented by a small group of officials. How they are chosen varies from state to state. Most of the time these electors are chosen by the candidate's political party, and publicly pledge to vote for a certain candidate. So what happens to our vote?
            When we go to the polls to vote we chose a candidate. If that candidate wins the majority of votes for that state all of the electoral votes for that state go to the winning candidate. Also known as a "winner takes all" system. Two exceptions are Nebraska and Maine. In these states the winning candidate is given two votes for the winning candidate and the rest are allocated to the candidate that won them. This is only the case in these two states. So basically ...
           You have three main entities. You, the voter, the presidential candidate, and the electors who do the actual voting for the president and Vice President. You vote for the candidate. If he/she wins that state they get votes equal to that states number of Senators and Representatives in the house. It's a third-party system. There are pros and cons to this system like anything else. That is a separate topic. This is a brief explanation on the ins and outs of the procedure that is the "Electoral College". I hope it was useful. This is just the opinion of one man.

I am pasting a couple of sites that reinforce all of this information below.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/06/what-is-the-electoral-college_n_2078970.html
http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/electoral-college/about.html